Think Eggs Are Not Good? Think Again

http://www.lef.org/news/LefDailyNews.htm?NewsID=13369&Section=Vitamins&utm_source=DailyHealthBulletin&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Vitamins&utm_content=Body+ContinueReading&utm_campaign=DHB_120512

A new study from Cornell University found that third trimester pregnant women who supplemented their diets with twice the recommended amount of choline per day delivered babies with lowered cortisol levels.  This means that the babies were able to manage stress in a healthier fashion.  The scientists speculate that the increased choline programs the body to manage stress better.  The author of the study, Marie Caudill, suggests that a long term benefit of this would be less risk for high blood pressure and less risk for type 2 diabetes.

Choline is not commonly added to prenatal vitamins.  From what foods does one obtain choline?  Egg yolks are a major source.  Others include beef, pork, chicken, milk, legumes, and some vegetables.

Other studies suggest that women who eat more choline are also less likely to get breast cancer and to have lowered risk of macular degeneration. (http://www.womenshealthmag.com/nutrition/benefits-of-eggs)

Contrary to common belief, there is no clear evidence that eating eggs increases one’s risk of heart attacks or stroke.

So there you have it.  Instead of that bagel for breakfast, I recommend 2 eggs (not just the whites) and vegetables.  Yes, you read that correctly.  Where does it say that we must have cereal and milk for breakfast?  Or a donut?  Or coffee and a muffin?  Get your day off to a good start with the food that contains the most complete protein content of any other food: whole eggs, and eliminate the sugar.

Bon Apetit

Thanks to Garry Gordon, MD,DO, MD(H) for spreading the good word.

About Cathie Lippman, M.D.

I invite you to visit my website: www.cathielippmanmd.com
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